360 Video: Watch thousands of Monarch butterflies flutter at Desert …


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PHOENIX – Each fall, thousands of Monarch butterflies migrate away from winter temperatures along the East Coast to the warmer climates in southern California and Mexico.

Because Arizona is geographically close to each, it’s possible to see an increase in Monarch and Queen butterflies in the garden or backyard this time of year, said Lauren Svorinic, assistant director of exhibits at the Desert Botanical Garden.

One tip to attract them, according to Svorinic, is to plant milkweed and other flower blooms. Monarch caterpillar larvae feed on milkweed, and full-grown butterflies like the nectar from the flowers, she said.

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Another way to see more than 1,100 butterflies at once is to visit the « Mighty Monarchs and the Plant Protectors » exhibit at the garden, which opens Saturday, Sept. 30 and runs through Nov. 19, 2017.

Svorinic said there are 13 species of butterflies, including Monarchs and Queens, that freely fly within the enclosure. 

The butterfly exhibit is open daily, 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., (same hours at the garden) and is included with regular garden admission, which is $13 for children and $25 for adults.

IF YOU GO:
Monarch butterfly exhibit at Desert Botanical Garden (Sept. 30 – Nov. 19)
Time: Daily, 9:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Admission: free with regular garden admission
www.dbg.org

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